August 2016

This post was originally published on this site

 

By Jocelyn Iverson, Director of Communications and Social Media

The United Nations (UN) has long been seen as the global leader for issues concerning human rights.  The relatively nascent anti-human trafficking movement is no exception, as can be seen by the adoption of the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (referenced as the “Palermo Protocol”) by the General Assembly in 2000.  The Palermo Protocol was an essential document in that it set forth the first global, standardized definition of human trafficking, as well as a three-pronged approach consisting of prevention, protection and prosecution (the “three Ps”).  But what has the UN done since the enactment of the protocol?  How is it assisting nations in the realization of the three Ps?  As with many movements, there has been a learning curve, and the UN has had to take into consideration its scope as well as its resources.

Initial Action

The first program rolled out by the UN was the Global Initiative to Fight Human Trafficking (UN.GIFT), which was launched in 2007 and planned as a finite program with an end date of December 2014.  The topic of human trafficking, as well as the UN.GIFT program, were mandated under the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) from the beginning.  This fact is significant because it dictated the frame through which human trafficking was viewed, and led to more of a crime-control approach rather than a rights-based approach.  Since the movement was rather young, and many countries still did not properly understand what human trafficking was, UN.GIFT focused largely on awareness raising and strategic partnerships.  This was vital work in order to build the necessary infrastructure to effectively combat human trafficking, but was rather high-level and did not address many of the varied nuances of how trafficking may present itself in different countries or regions.

A Need for Reliable Data

The UN quickly recognized the lack of reliable data on the subject, and as a response launched the Global Report on Trafficking in Persons in 2009 under UN.GIFT.  Although the program under which it was originally drafted has come to an end, the Global Report shall continue as a biennial report, scheduled to be released later this year, showing trafficking flows as well as regional data.  Unlike many other reports on human trafficking, the data used in the UN report is strictly that which is reported by its member states, which has its pros and cons as a methodology.  It is beneficial in that the numbers are solid and are not based on assumptions or extrapolations, which can lead to significant errors.  However, on the negative side there may be large populations missed either due to the hidden nature of the crime, or possibly a lack of transparency in government reporting.

Bringing Timely Issues into Focus

In 2015 the UN launched a new initiative, the Global Action Against Trafficking in Persons and the Smuggling of Migrants (GLO.ACT).  The four-year joint initiative between the UN and the European Union will focus on both human trafficking and migrant smuggling, as interrelated issues, in 15 strategically selected countries.  By narrowing the scope of this new initiative, the goal is to be able to craft and implement a comprehensive approach to combatting human trafficking and migrant smuggling which is tailored to the country selected.  Since migrant smuggling is such a significant issue at the moment, and one which can greatly contribute to human trafficking, this is certainly a program with a great deal of potential.

Valuable Resources for Governments and Researchers

Beyond the initiatives, actions and reports aimed at combatting human trafficking, the UN has made available a number of other resources.  There are toolkits, training manuals and draft legislation, which can all be extremely useful for governments with limited resources available to commit to anti-human trafficking measures.  There is also a Human Trafficking Knowledge Portal, which consists of a case law database and a database of relevant legislation within member states.  The portal is constantly being updated, and the available information continues to expand, which can be very useful for organizations to reference quickly and easily.

A Leading Voice But Limited in its Action

The United Nations must continue to be a leading voice in the fight against human trafficking, but this is not something it can tackle on its own.  The organization operates with limited resources, and thus must depend on partners in government, civil society and private business to carry out the actions that bring about real change.  Additionally, the UN is constrained by its respect for state sovereignty, and cannot act without the consent of its member states.  Hopefully through a continued dedication to sound research, as well as more tailored programs such as GLO.ACT, the UN will provide the guidance needed to comprehensively combat this global crime.  

Photo Credit: Yann Forget (own work) via Wikimedia Commons

 


About the Human Trafficking Center

The Human Trafficking Center, housed in the University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School of International Studies, is the only two-year, graduate-level, professional-training degree in human trafficking in the United States. One way graduate students contribute to the study of human trafficking is by publishing research-based blogs. The HTC was founded in 2002 to apply sound research and reliable methodology to the field of human trafficking research and advocacy.

Founded in 1964, the Josef Korbel School of International Studies is one of the world’s leading schools for the study of international relations. The School offers degree programs in international affairs and is named in honor of its founder and first dean, Josef Korbel.

 

Note: There is a print link embedded within this post, please visit this post to print it.


This post was originally published on this site

 

By Jocelyn Iverson, Director of Communications and Social Media

The United Nations (UN) has long been seen as the global leader for issues concerning human rights.  The relatively nascent anti-human trafficking movement is no exception, as can be seen by the adoption of the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children (referenced as the “Palermo Protocol”) by the General Assembly in 2000.  The Palermo Protocol was an essential document in that it set forth the first global, standardized definition of human trafficking, as well as a three-pronged approach consisting of prevention, protection and prosecution (the “three Ps”).  But what has the UN done since the enactment of the protocol?  How is it assisting nations in the realization of the three Ps?  As with many movements, there has been a learning curve, and the UN has had to take into consideration its scope as well as its resources.

Initial Action

The first program rolled out by the UN was the Global Initiative to Fight Human Trafficking (UN.GIFT), which was launched in 2007 and planned as a finite program with an end date of December 2014.  The topic of human trafficking, as well as the UN.GIFT program, were mandated under the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) from the beginning.  This fact is significant because it dictated the frame through which human trafficking was viewed, and led to more of a crime-control approach rather than a rights-based approach.  Since the movement was rather young, and many countries still did not properly understand what human trafficking was, UN.GIFT focused largely on awareness raising and strategic partnerships.  This was vital work in order to build the necessary infrastructure to effectively combat human trafficking, but was rather high-level and did not address many of the varied nuances of how trafficking may present itself in different countries or regions.

A Need for Reliable Data

The UN quickly recognized the lack of reliable data on the subject, and as a response launched the Global Report on Trafficking in Persons in 2009 under UN.GIFT.  Although the program under which it was originally drafted has come to an end, the Global Report shall continue as a biennial report, scheduled to be released later this year, showing trafficking flows as well as regional data.  Unlike many other reports on human trafficking, the data used in the UN report is strictly that which is reported by its member states, which has its pros and cons as a methodology.  It is beneficial in that the numbers are solid and are not based on assumptions or extrapolations, which can lead to significant errors.  However, on the negative side there may be large populations missed either due to the hidden nature of the crime, or possibly a lack of transparency in government reporting.

Bringing Timely Issues into Focus

In 2015 the UN launched a new initiative, the Global Action Against Trafficking in Persons and the Smuggling of Migrants (GLO.ACT).  The four-year joint initiative between the UN and the European Union will focus on both human trafficking and migrant smuggling, as interrelated issues, in 15 strategically selected countries.  By narrowing the scope of this new initiative, the goal is to be able to craft and implement a comprehensive approach to combatting human trafficking and migrant smuggling which is tailored to the country selected.  Since migrant smuggling is such a significant issue at the moment, and one which can greatly contribute to human trafficking, this is certainly a program with a great deal of potential.

Valuable Resources for Governments and Researchers

Beyond the initiatives, actions and reports aimed at combatting human trafficking, the UN has made available a number of other resources.  There are toolkits, training manuals and draft legislation, which can all be extremely useful for governments with limited resources available to commit to anti-human trafficking measures.  There is also a Human Trafficking Knowledge Portal, which consists of a case law database and a database of relevant legislation within member states.  The portal is constantly being updated, and the available information continues to expand, which can be very useful for organizations to reference quickly and easily.

A Leading Voice But Limited in its Action

The United Nations must continue to be a leading voice in the fight against human trafficking, but this is not something it can tackle on its own.  The organization operates with limited resources, and thus must depend on partners in government, civil society and private business to carry out the actions that bring about real change.  Additionally, the UN is constrained by its respect for state sovereignty, and cannot act without the consent of its member states.  Hopefully through a continued dedication to sound research, as well as more tailored programs such as GLO.ACT, the UN will provide the guidance needed to comprehensively combat this global crime.  

Photo Credit: Yann Forget (own work) via Wikimedia Commons

 


About the Human Trafficking Center

The Human Trafficking Center, housed in the University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School of International Studies, is the only two-year, graduate-level, professional-training degree in human trafficking in the United States. One way graduate students contribute to the study of human trafficking is by publishing research-based blogs. The HTC was founded in 2002 to apply sound research and reliable methodology to the field of human trafficking research and advocacy.

Founded in 1964, the Josef Korbel School of International Studies is one of the world’s leading schools for the study of international relations. The School offers degree programs in international affairs and is named in honor of its founder and first dean, Josef Korbel.

 

Note: There is a print link embedded within this post, please visit this post to print it.



This post was originally published on this site

Post Summary: 

Yesterday, 6-year-old Trevor’s body was found in Uganda. He had been sacrificed by a witchdoctor. Our staff writer Kari was at his burial.

Pray with us for Trevor’s mother, and see how our Amber Alert program is working to bring children home when they’re abducted:

When my son, Nick was 6, he began taking a school bus to his babysitter’s house after school. Thinking of Nick walking a block down the hill to Barb’s house frightened me. Until then, he’d walked everywhere with his dad and me, usually holding our hands.

“Nick,” I told him sternly, “When you get off that bus, you cross the street and run to Barb’s house. Do not look right. Do not look left. Do not talk to anyone you see on the way. Just run.”

Category: 




This post was originally published on this site

Post Summary: 

What earns humanitarian aid workers the right to speak into the lives of others? Simple: love! Crazy love.

This #WorldHumanitarianDay, hear from our president Richard Stearns about how the example of our staff provokes the question that only the gospel can answer.

Night had fallen in Juba, South Sudan as we pulled out of World Vision’s office after a long briefing. It was risky to drive in the dark in this conflict-prone country, so we—my World Vision colleagues, The Washington Post columnist Michael Gerson, and I—hurried to get back to the hotel. Suddenly, out of nowhere, six men in camouflage fatigues surrounded the vehicle, AK-47s drawn, shouting and gesturing in a language we didn’t understand.

Category: 



This post was originally published on this site

Post Summary: 

As athletes compete this week in Brazil, they are striving for the glory of being the best in the world.

Former Olympic runner Lopez Lomong’s story—of being a Lost Boy of Sudan and refugee, to becoming an American and Olympian—shows us what true glory looks like: “a life lived for others.”

Read his story.

A little boy who would become an Olympic athlete is flying—running as fast as he can barefoot, kicking a soccer ball on a dirt playing field at a refugee camp in Kenya, aiming for the goal.

A whistle blows.

The future 1500-meter champion is called to the sidelines and the ball is taken away. He walks dejectedly to his new position—as goalie.

Category: 



This post was originally published on this site

By Marie-Claire Bagazonzya, Research Assistant

Background

Uganda is a landlocked country in East Africa. Coined the “Pearl of Africa,” it has an abundance of wildlife and natural resources which put the country on the map as a tourist destination. However, due to Uganda’s low GDP and young population, there are less job opportunities available for the many young people trying to enter the workforce . Various Ugandan recruitment agencies (licensed and unlicensed) for years have advertised potential well-paying jobs abroad – mostly in the Middle East. The promise of a well-paid job in a foreign country has persuaded many to make the move abroad. This has resulted in exploitation and abuse because once in the destination countries their migrant status leaves them highly vulnerable to situations of commercial sexual exploitation and forced labor.

Current Problem

The lack of job opportunities in Uganda has caused  Saudi Arabia to become a destination for young Ugandan workers (especially young women) to be employed for domestic work. About 500 Ugandan women have traveled there in search of such opportunities. Uganda signed a bilateral agreement with Saudi Arabia in July 2015 to send Ugandans to the Middle East in an effort to counter the high unemployment rates experienced by the young population. However, this decision was rescinded given reports on inhumane abuse experienced by Ugandan women during their stay. This prompted a ban that was put into effect on January 22, 2016 by Wilson Muruli Mukasa, Minister of Gender, Labour and Social Development. This ban would enforce that no more Ugandan workers would be sent to Saudi Arabia until working conditions were changed.

Uganda in the TIP Report

The Trafficking in Persons (TIP) Report is an annual report issued by the U.S. Department of State’s Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons. It ranks governments based on US perceptions of their efforts to acknowledge and combat human trafficking. Previous TIP reports published prior to 2016 have stated that Saudi Arabia is a destination country for Ugandan trafficking victims. For this reason, Uganda signed the bilateral agreement with Saudi Arabia in an attempt to minimize the number of Ugandans trafficked there. However, the agreement by itself was not enough and proved ineffective.  It is alarming that the Ugandan government did not take even stronger precautions such as investing more in an entity overseeing the dealings of recruitment agencies and radio advertisements after the TIP reports were issued. On the same note, according to the 2016 TIP Report, the Ugandan government is heavily relying on international organizations and NGOs to provide survivors of trafficking with the necessary services due to their lack of funding and resources.

Insufficient Resources

Despite the accounts of physical and sexual abuse, as well as withholding of payments reported, there has been little prosecution of the exploiters / traffickers.  This is due to the lack of funding available to pursue those suspected of trafficking in persons.  As is evidenced by the reliance on NGOs noted above, the Ugandan government is not allocating sufficient resources to address the significant human trafficking problem currently facing the country.

A Possible Solution?

The Kyampisi Childcare Ministries (KCM), which caters to trafficked children, is one example of an NGO that has taken in the returning Ugandan women and created a rehabilitation center for them. 10 women have received care and services from this organization so far. As of March 2016, another 17 women were held at a shelter in Saudi Arabia waiting for proper documentation to leave. It seems as though the best solution to this issue in Uganda, as of now, is the work of NGOs like KCM and individuals such as Agnes Igoye.

Agnes Igoye is the Deputy National Coordinator for the Prevention of Trafficking in Persons Office, a Deputy Chair on the National Anti-Trafficking Task Force and a senior immigration officer and training coordinator at Uganda’s Directorate of Citizenship and Immigration control. She has helped in the training of law enforcement as well as the creation of National Action Plans (NAPs), along with her fellow colleagues on the Task Force. These NAPs, among other projects taken on by the Task Force, include creating a database to track trends in trafficking within the country. These intensified efforts by KCM and Agnes Igoye are the type of programs that can plausibly affect real change in Uganda. These solutions tackle the issue of lack of resources that law enforcement agencies are faced with. It not only gives them the opportunity to learn how to interact with Ugandan survivors of trafficking but also a way to identify these survivors in their own community.

Photo taken in Uganda by the author


About the Human Trafficking Center

The Human Trafficking Center, housed in the University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School of International Studies, is the only two-year, graduate-level, professional-training degree in human trafficking in the United States. One way graduate students contribute to the study of human trafficking is by publishing research-based blogs. The HTC was founded in 2002 to apply sound research and reliable methodology to the field of human trafficking research and advocacy.

Founded in 1964, the Josef Korbel School of International Studies is one of the world’s leading schools for the study of international relations. The School offers degree programs in international affairs and is named in honor of its founder and first dean, Josef Korbel.

 

Note: There is a print link embedded within this post, please visit this post to print it.


This post was originally published on this site

Post Summary: 

This week (August 1-7) is World Breastfeeding Week!

Our nutrition expert writes about how exclusive “breastfeeding really is the best start a newborn can have.”

Read about the impact that breastfeeding and good nutrition training is making in Ethiopia.

The Lancet Breastfeeding Series was released on January 29 with little fanfare outside of the nutrition community. I attended the launch of the series in Washington, DC and was more than impressed with the main findings:

Category: